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Stop Everyday Killers: An inspiring campaign with a very important purpose

Blog date

07.09.2018

Author

Hannah Laker
Senior Account Executive

We love to shout about the impressive campaigns we’re seeing in our industry and we’ve taken a closer look at one of our recent favourites…

Every 24 minutes in the US someone dies from a prescribed opioid overdose and each year around 22,000 people are lost to the drug. These statistics are staggering, and rightfully triggered one of the most important integrated campaigns of the past year.

Through its ‘Stop Everyday Killers’ campaign, non-profit health organisation The National Safety Council (NSC) is committed to taking action and educating Americans to tackle the issue. As part of this campaign, it launched the ‘Prescribed to Death’ memorial, an experiential wall made up of 22,000 pills, each carved with the face of an individual who has fatally overdosed. A new pill was added to the wall every 24 minutes via data-led technology – highlighting the tragic rate at which opioid overdoses happen.

The memorial visited cities across the US who have been hit the hardest by the crisis, gaining both national and regional media coverage along the way, as well as strong engagement on social media with the hashtag #prescribedtodeath. Alongside the memorial, the campaign handed out over 1 million ‘Warn Me’ labels nationwide, for individuals to stick on their insurance cards to encourage conversations from pharmacists and doctors around the dangers of the drug.

To date, the campaign has achieved over 2.4bn earned impressions, nearly 13m video views and a 2,017% increase in shared Facebook impressions, and it also deservedly won multiple awards at Cannes this year.
And while these impressive results are certainly an accolade, the reason we like this campaign so much here at Speed is that it has a purpose and is truly making a difference. The NSC has created an extremely powerful and arresting image with the wall, honouring the victims of overprescribed opioids while bringing attention to a preventable issue that, until now, has had quite a low public profile, ultimately raising awareness globally and prompting potentially life-saving conversations.

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