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Top tips to build media relationships

Building relationships with journalist contacts is THE key starting point for all media relations.

It is possible to pick-up the phone and wow a journalist with a story without having spoken to them previously, but the stronger that relationship gets, the easier your job becomes.

Contacts you’ve built a rapport with will likely give you more time on the phone, come to you when they need expert commentary and could even act as a sounding board for creative ideas during the planning phase of a campaign.

Here’s the top five tips from our media masters at Speed:

  • Keep journalists informed
    If you are working with a team of experts across your brands, keep journalists updated with who these are highlighting what they are available to comment on
  • Do them a favour
    Try and send them any tips, content ideas or news stories that aren’t branded by your clients, but you think will work well for them. This is always appreciated
  • Social media
    Following journalists on social media (LinkedIn, Twitter, Insta) will give you insight into their interests, frustrations, work and personal lives
  • Look out for life celebrations
    Keep an eye on their social channels and give them a follow, this will help with knowing what they are into and with spotting any life celebrations such as promotions, weddings and
    birthdays which you could acknowledge, or even send gifts for
  • Media Meets
    One of the best ways to build up relationships with existing journalist contacts, as well as create new ones through a more personal way. This will also give you a way to get direct feedback to share with the team and your clients

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